Whyr

Whyr

(whur | vyihr)

Biological Information

Sz: .8 m. | 31” (standing)
Wt: .8 kg. | 2 lbs.
Loc: Pale Shores
Prd: None
Var: Red, White, Blue, Purple

References
  1. Four Species
  2. From Sea to Ice
  3. What the Cold Brings In
  4. Expired Tools

Four distinct species of birds from the same genus that are commonly grouped together, whyr share a number of similarities.1 The origin of the name is likely foreign, as Aevot does not contain the letter “W” or any associated sounds. These similarities include inverted beaks, raised sections of yellow and green feathers on the heads, bright yellow eyes, and three clawed talons.2

Red Whyr

Biological Information

Tpt: Aggressive

Commonly seen around farming structures, whether they be grain, vegetable, or fruit, red whyrs are a relatively aggressive pests known across Pale Shores. They reportedly have a knack for breaking into structures, a skill made possible by their relatively small beaks.3

The smallest of the four species, red whyrs are predominantly covered in red feathers. The most colourful of the species, their bodies feature yellow-green, turquoise, and cyan feathers.1 Though their diet consists mostly of insects, they have shown a strong preference for fruit, if available, and are able to get the fruit of the unud tree unavailable to other birds due to their beaks.

White Whyr

Biological Information

Tpt: Skittish

For many years considered a myth due to their rare sightings, white whyrs are extremely reserved and cautious of other animals and especially omneuttians.1 

Their wingspan is the largest of all four species of whyr and the golden feathers that adorn their necks, tails, and wings have been valuable.4 Though little is known about this species, their diet consists of solely fruits and their seeds that are not widely cultivated by avocs.1

Blue Whyr

Biological Information

Tpt: Territorial

Commonly seen around farming structures, whether they be grain, vegetable, or fruit, red whyrs are a relatively aggressive pests known across Pale Shores. They reportedly have a knack for breaking into structures, a skill made possible by their relatively small beaks.3

The smallest of the four species, red whyrs are predominantly covered in red feathers. The most colourful of the species, their bodies feature yellow-green, turquoise, and cyan feathers.1 Though their diet consists mostly of insects, they have shown a strong preference for fruit, if available, and are able to get the fruit of the unud tree unavailable to other birds due to their beaks.

Purple Whyr

Biological Information

Tpt: Predatory

Also known as the blood why due to it being carnivorous, the purple whyr is known across Pale Shores to attack and kill avocs to chew their bones.1 Young avocs everywhere are cautioned not to stray too far alone explicitly because of the birds’ “sport” hunting of avocs.3

It is believed that purple whyrs are entirely carnivorous and has the shortest beak among the four species. They have been observed to chew the bones of other mammals killed such as cranipxum and marnma, though their bones are significantly smaller than avocs.1 Like the other whyrs, it has differently coloured feathers on the throat, wings, and tail. Though it was speculated at one point to be all purple with the stains of blood, it can be confirmed that the deep red colouration are the actual colours of the feathers.1